Jan 142013
 

Trust Me, I'm Lying.
Ryan Holiday.
Page: 71

I have long disdained the internet ‘troll’, the guy who intentionally stirs up online discussions just for the fun of it. Yet, from this book, it is obvious that the blog writer must himself be a troll if he desires to be ‘successful’.

For blogs, practical utility is often a liability. It is a traffic killer. So are other potentially positive attributes. It’s hard to get trolls angry enough to comment while being fair or reasonable. Waiting for the whole story to unfold can be a surefire way to eliminate the possibility for follow-up posts. So can pointing out that an issue is frivolous. Being the voice of reason does also.

As the old saying goes, any publicity is good publicity, so it seems on the online world. It does not matter if they are talking about you because they like you or they hate you, as long as they are talking about you.

Jan 132013
 

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.
Page: 56
Indeed, whole grain bread breaks down to glucose slower than white bread does, so its glycemic index (not load) is a little lower. However, those tiny kernels are packed with starch. Slice for slice, whole grain bread contains up to twice as much starch as white bread. You simply get more food in a slice of whole grain bread. The glycemic load of whole grain bread–which takes into account the amount of carbohydrate in a typical serving–is actually higher than that of white bread.

We have been told that whole grains are better for us. Even thought a slice of whole grain bread might be more nutritious, it also impacts blood glucose more than plain white bread. If you are insulin resistant, in other words, starch is the culprit that is making you fat, then a slight bump in nutrition does not outweigh the glucose shock to your health.

Jan 132013
 

Free YouTube Downloader

I noticed this morning when publishing a new WordPress post that it contained a link to “Free YouTube Downloader” that I had not placed When I investigated some more I found more Free YouTube Downloader links in various fields, attempting to hide itself by also inserting about a dozen linefeeds first so that the field looks empty unless you scroll way down.

I had just written a post last night and this rogue url was not inserted anywhere in the post. MY first I suspicion was that a virus had infected my computer or possibly my WordPress code. Microsoft Security Essentials found nothing on my computer and my WordPress virus plugin had not detected any new code.

I decided to eliminate a possibility and started up Firefox to edit the post. Interestingly, the Free YouTube Downloader rogue url was not anywhere to be seen. I went back and edited the post using Chrome and the rogue url inserted itself again.

Web Video Downloader 2.2

Having isolated the problem to the Google Chrome Browser, I turned off all the browser extensions to see if one of them was the culprit. Sure enough, the problem was gone, so I turned the extensions back on in groups till the problem reappeared then isolated it to a single extension, Web Video Downloader, which probably should have been my first guess. I have had this plugin installed for quite a while though not sure what I ever actually used it for. It is interesting that it would wait so long to deliver its malicious payload. Just remember to disable/remove the extension on each of your computers! I didn’t think about it and after fixing it on one computer found the problem occurring on my other machine. duh!

The extensions website link from the Chrome Browser Extension page reported that the extension had been removed by its author. Sure wish Chrome would let the user know when an active plugin is removed. Only thing I can assume is that this extension got updated with some bad code inserted

Here is the link that was inserted into my WordPress blog fields:
  http://download.cnet.com /Free-Youtube-Downloader-Pro/3000-2071_4-75329731.html
When I searched Google for the string “3000-2071_4-75329731″ I found a number of other sites with this same link, so I am not alone.

Jan 132013
 

Trust Me, I'm Lying.
Ryan Holiday.
Page: 64

Ever notice the many pics on Facebook that ask you to “Share” or “Like” them are all heart-tuggers or fear-inducers? Of course, if they weren’t effective you would probably would never have seen it since one of your friends usually had to share it first.

The media is in the evil position of needing to go negative and play tricks with your psyche in order to drive you to share their materials online. For instance, in studies where subjects are shown negative video footage (war, and airplane crash, an execution, a natural disaster), they become more aroused, can better recall what happened, pay more attention, and engage more cognitive resources to consume the media than nonnegative footage. That’s the kind of stuff that will make you hit “share this.” They push your buttons so you’ll pres theirs.

Things must be negative but not too negative. Hopelessness, despair–these drive us to do nothing. Pity, empathy–those drive us to do something, like get up from our computers to act. But anger, fear, excitement, or laughter–these drive us to spread. They drive us to do something that makes us feel as if we are doing something, when in reality we are only contributing to what is probably a superficial and utterly meaningless conversation.

Whether it is Gawker or the Drudge Report, they cannot be successful unless they toy with our emotions. The sad thing is that they are successful, they raise our emotional state but rarely do they get us to action beyond a comment or a button press.

Jan 122013
 

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.
Page: 50

How easy is it to lower the glycemic load of your everyday diet?

If you get rid of just four foods–flour products, potatoes, rice, and soft drinks–the glycemic load of your diet will be a fraction of what it was. You don’t even need a list of glycemic loads to tell you what to eat. Starch is never hidden or blended into other foods. You can see it from across the room. The culprits are even color-coded for you: They are usually white. The only other foods with glycemic loads as high as the starchy stuff are juices and soft drinks. So, if you cut out the starch and the sugar-containing beverages, you eliminate nearly all of the glucose shocks in your diet.

The glycemic load diet is much more lenient than the low-carb/high-fat diet I have been on but it probably more closely resembles the diet I will continue with for the foreseeable future. Once I am down to my goal weight, about another 10 pounds, the only thing I really plan on changing is that I might have some rice or potato with my meal but in much smaller quantities than in the past.

Here’s my advice: Forget about lists. Just don’t eat more than a third of a serving of flour products, potatoes, or rice at any meal, and abstain from sugar-containing soft drinks and fruit juices. Otherwise, eat anything you want. There’s probably not enough starch or sugar in the rest of your food to cause you trouble. A weight-loss program can’t get any simpler than that, which is why this will finally be the weight loss program that works for you.

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Jan 112013
 

Trust Me, I'm Lying.
Ryan Holiday.
Page: 59

Study the top stories at Digg or MSN.com and you’ll notice a pattern: the top stories all polarize people. If you make it threaten people’s 3 Bs — behavior, belief, or belongings — you get a huge virus-like dispersion.

–Tim Ferriss, #1 New York Times Bestselling Author

If people share your blog post with their friends across social media platforms then you are golden. If they just read it and maybe even make a short comment, you may as well not have written it.

Bloggers are paid by advertising placed on their site. Traffic must be generated and the best, and really only, way to get that traffic is to have others advertise for you by talking about your post. A blogger does not care if you love the post or hate it, as long as he can get you to tell your friends about it.

Jan 112013
 

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.
Page: 44-47
Nutritionists now rate foods according to their glycemic indexes, the amount a food raises blood glucose compared with a benchmark–usually white bread. An apple, for example, has a glycemic index of 52, which means that 50 grams of carbohydrate in an apple raises blood glucose levels 52 percent as much as 50 grams of carbohydrate in white bread.

Sounds quite scientific and easy to use except for one important fact. The index is “per 50 grams of carbohydrate” not 50 grams of the food or the “per serving” we are used to seeing as the standard on most nutrition labels. Researchers were not measuring the quantity of carbohydrate in a food but the impact of that food’s type of carbohydrate on blood glucose.

However, the amount of available carbohydrate in various plant-based foods varies tremendously. For example, because carrots contain so much water and unavailable carbohydrate in the form of indigestible fiber, to provide 50 grams of available carbohydrate, reserchers had to feed each subject seven full-size carrots. In contrast, to provide 50 grams of available carbohydrate in spaghetti, they had to feed subjects only a cupful.

Now, when you open the fridge do you grab 7 full size carrots? 7 carrots eaten together have a glycemic index of 68. A cup of spaghetti has an index of 64. So, even though almost equal in terms of glycemic index, a cup of spaghetti has 7 times the impact of a carrot on your blood sugar.

Correcting glycemic indexes for serving size exposes refined carbs as the culprits they really are. Bagels, for example, aren’t just a little worse than carrots, they’re terrible! You would have to eat 30 raw carrots to get the glucose shock you get from one bagel.

Adjusting a food’s glycemic index based on serving size is called a food’s glycemic load. Glycemic load, then, is a measure of the effect on blood sugar of a normal serving size of food. So, if we want to control blood sugar spikes and the body’s insulin response, the glycemic load and not glycemic index of a food is what we need to be concerned with.

Jan 102013
 

Trust Me, I'm Lying.
Ryan Holiday.
Page: 14
One early media critic put it this way: We’re a country governed by public opinion, and public opinion is largely governed by the press, so isn’t it critical to understand what governs the press? What rules over the media, he concluded, rules over the country.

Controlling the conversation means controlling public opinion. Whether the discussion is about abortion, gun control, or any divisive issue, each side wants to be the positive side. The ‘pro-life’ side loses because they are labeled ‘anti-abortion’ by journalists. The anti-2nd Amendment group wins because they want ‘reasonable gun control’ and are not called ‘anti-gun rights’ in the media.

Jan 102013
 

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.
Page: 43
The reason most diets fail is simply that people can’t stick with them. People crave the richness of fat and quickly either fall of the wagon or try to satisfy their hunger by eating too much starch and sugar. That’s why low-fat diets require you to count calories–essentially to go hungry. Low-carb diets are easier to follow because you can eat satisfying amounts of food. However, they often make the mistake of restricting too many foods. Currently popular low-carb diets limit fruits, vegetables, dairy products, and sweets and usually can’t resist throwing in some low-cholesterol advice. All these restrictions inevitably lead to food cravings and diet failure. However, most important, they divert attention from the real culprits: foods that raise your body’s demands for insulin.

I have been amazed how my appetite has dwindled. I no longer have an urge for a snack 2 hours after breakfast, lunch, or dinner. It used to be that just the sight of some confection would cause my mouth to water and my fingers to reach out. Now, I can just say they look nice but have no compunction to put them in my mouth.


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Jan 102013
 

Louie Giglio Really shows that ‘toleration’, ‘reasonable’, and ‘sensible’ are all words that only work one way.

Here are some quotes from the original post Louie Giglio and the New State Church:

As citizens, we ought to insist that the President stand up to his “base” and articulate a vision of a healthy pluralism in the public square. Notice that the problem is not that this evangelical wants to “impose his religion” on the rest of society. The problem is not that he wants to exclude homosexuals or others from the public square or of their civil rights. The problem is that he won’t say that they can go to heaven without repentance. That’s not a civil issue, but a religious test of orthodoxy.
Note, this now doesn’t simply exclude harsh and intemperate statements or even activism. Simply holding the view held by every Roman pontiff and by every congregation and synagogue in the world until very recent days is enough to make one “radioactive” in public.
It turns out we’re circling around to where we should have been all along: with the understanding that religious liberty isn’t ‘toleration’ and separation of church and state isn’t secularism.

Here is a portion of Giglio’s withdrawl statement:

Due to a message of mine that has surfaced from 15-20 years ago, it is likely that my participation, and the prayer I would offer, will be dwarfed by those seeking to make their agenda the focal point of the inauguration. Clearly, speaking on this issue has not been in the range of my priorities in the past fifteen years. Instead, my aim has been to call people to ultimate significance as we make much of Jesus Christ.
He concludes his blog post with a very gracious and Christian statement

The issue of homosexuality (which a particular message of mine some 20 years ago addressed) is one of the most difficult our nation will navigate. However, individuals’ rights of freedom, and the collective right to hold differing views on any subject is a critical balance we, as a people, must recover and preserve.

As a pastor, my mission is to love people, and lead them well, while lifting up the name of Jesus above anything else. I’m confident that anyone who knows me or has listened to the multitude of messages I have given in the last decade would most likely conclude that I am not easily characterized as being opposed to people—any people. Rather, I am constantly seeking to understand where all people are coming from and how to best serve them as I point them to Jesus.


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