The Civil War Months by Walter Coffey

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Nov 142013
 

The Civil War Months.
Walter Coffey.
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I enjoy reading about the Civil War. The war facinates me. For me the hardest part is keeping everything strait.

This book looks to be a great read.
The author tells the story of the war from month to month so maybe I can finally get a skeleton I can hang all the facts on.

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  • The Civil War Months by Walter Coffey

  • Book Info

    The Civil War Months: A Month-by-Month Compendium of the War Between the States
    by Walter Coffey
    Publisher: AuthorHouse
    Published: 06/01/2012
    ISBN-10: 1468580213
    ISBN-13: 978-1468580211
    Started: 11/06/2013
    Finished: 02/07/2014
    Source: NetGalley
    Reason: Always a sucker for a Civil War book.
    Format: ebook

    Publisher Synopsis

    The Civil War obliterated America’s past, along with many of the founders’ visions of what America should be. Replacing those visions was the America that we have today. Any true understanding of America, both past and present, must include a specific understanding of this conflict.

    This work, with a thought-provoking introduction exploring the true causes of the war, traces the entire story of the conflict in a concise monthly summary. In addition to all the major events that shaped the war, key facts that have disappeared from most mainstream texts are also included, such as:

    * Both Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis lost young sons during the war
    * The legendary Robert E. Lee faced intense southern criticism for military failures in the war’s first year
    * U.S. forces battled the Sioux Indians during the war, leading to the largest mass execution in American history
    * A former Ohio congressman was banished to the South by Lincoln for opposing the war

    Facts are explored and myths are exposed as the conflict is put in its proper chronological perspective. For anyone seeking a general resource guide to the seminal event in American history, this is essential reading.


    Author Info
    Walter Coffey was born in Joliet, Illinois and is a graduate of Joliet Junior College and Loyola University of Chicago. He has written several works of historical fiction and nonfiction, and his work has earned critical praise from the Quincy Writers' Guild and Foreword Magazine. He is also a member of the Houston Civil War Round Table who has been honored by the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Walter currently resides with his wife Gianna in Texas and can be contacted at WalterCoffey.com.

    Nov 062013
     

    The Civil War and American Art .
    Eleanor Jones Harvey.

    Former enslaved woman Harriet Jacobs (fig. 102) noted with disgust, “The secrets of slavery are concealed like those of the Inquisition. My master was, to my knowledge, the father of eleven slaves. But did the mothers dare tell who was the father of their children? Did other slaves dare allude to it, except in whispers among themselves? No indeed!” That a man could enslave his own children struck many as one of the gross moral failings of a slave society, and one which took place with far greater frequency than anyone was comfortable believing.

    Page: 107

    Owning slaves seems so anachronistic to us today. We cannot imagine it. How much more unthinkable is it that one would father children and see them as nothing more than chattel.

    Book Posts

  • The Civil War and American Art – Eleanor Jones Harvey
  • Vocab: Insouciant – Try to use it nonchalantly
  • Vocab: elided – to leave out of consideration, to omit
  • Vocab: Stint – To Limit or Restrict
  • Enslaving Your Own Children


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    Oct 282013
     

    Scoffing at death was the code of the “Bohemian Brigade”—the tongue-in-cheek name that Junius Browne and other Northern war correspondents had coined to describe themselves. A self-conscious romantic, Browne reveled in the idea that they were “knights of the quill,” swashbuckling poet-warriors living “a nomadic, careless, halfliterary, half-vagabondish life.” They traveled into the hell of battle and returned to tell the tale, risking their lives “purely from a love of adventure—to have the experience—which is a very natural desire of the poetico-philosophical temperament.”

    Page: 21

    The adventures of these “Knights of the Quill” stretch incredulity — yet are true. It is hard to imagine the dangers they put themselves in just to “get the story”.

    Book Posts

  • Junius and Albert’s Adventures in the Confederacy: A Civil War Odyssey – Peter Carlson
  • Civil War Bohemian Brigade


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    Oct 072013
     

    Glorious War.
    Thom Hatch.
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    Civil War books always get my attention and I know nothing about Custer except for his final skirmish. When I saw this book available on NetGalley to read and review, I knew I wanted to read it.

    Book Posts

  • Glorious War: The Civil War Adventures of George Armstrong Custer by Thom Hatch

  • Book Info

    Glorious War: The Civil War Adventures of George Armstrong Custer
    by Thom Hatch
    Publisher: St. Martin's Press
    Published: 12/10/2013
    ISBN-10: 1250028507
    ISBN-13: 978-1250028501
    Started: 10/07/2013
    Finished: 11/10/2013
    Source: NetGalley
    Format: ebook

    Publisher Synopsis

    Glorious War, the thrilling and definitive biography of George Armstrong Custer’s Civil War years, is nothing short of a heart-pounding cavalry charge through the battlefield heroics that thrust the gallant young officer into the national spotlight in the midst of the country’s darkest hours. From West Point to the daring actions that propelled him to the rank of general at age twenty-three to his unlikely romance with Libbie Bacon, Custer’s exploits are the stuff of legend.

    Always leading his men from the front with a personal courage seldom seen before or since, he was a key part of nearly every major engagement in the east. Not only did Custer capture the first battle flag taken by the Union and receive the white flag of surrender at Appomattox, but his field generalship at Gettysburg against Confederate cavalry General Jeb Stuart had historic implications in changing the course of that pivotal battle.

    For decades, historians have looked at Custer strictly through the lens of his death on the frontier, casting him as a failure. While some may say that the events that took place at the Little Big Horn are illustrative of America’s bloody westward expansion, they have in the process unjustly eclipsed Custer’s otherwise extraordinarily life and outstanding career and fall far short of encompassing his incredible service to his country. This biography of thundering cannons, pounding hooves, and stunning successes tells the true story of the origins of one of history’s most dynamic and misunderstood figures. Award-winning historian Thom Hatch reexamines Custer’s early career to rebalance the scales and show why Custer’s epic fall could never have happened without the spectacular rise that made him an American legend.


    Author Info
    THOM HATCH is the author of eight books, including The Last Outlaws: The Lives and Legends of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Custer Companion: A Comprehensive Guide to the Life of George Armstrong Custer and the Plains Indians Wars. A Marine Corps Vietnam veteran and a historian who specializes in the American West, the Civil War, and Native American conflicts, Hatch has received the prestigious Spur Award from the Western Writers of America for his previous work. He lives in Colorado with his wife and daughter.


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    Jun 112013
     

    The Civil War and American Art .
    Eleanor Jones Harvey.
    amazon.com
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    I requested this book as a review copy from NetGalley because of my fascination with the Civil War and my love for photography. I must admit I never considered how a painter might interpret current events in landscape paintings. Battle scenes, yes, but not in ‘regular’ landscapes. Looks to be quite interesting.

    Book Posts

  • The Civil War and American Art – Eleanor Jones Harvey
  • Vocab: Insouciant – Try to use it nonchalantly
  • Vocab: elided – to leave out of consideration, to omit
  • Vocab: Stint – To Limit or Restrict
  • Enslaving Your Own Children

  • Book Info

    The Civil War and American Art
    by Eleanor Jones Harvey
    Publisher: Yale University Press
    Published: 12/03/2012
    ISBN-10: 0300187335
    ISBN-13: 978-0300187335
    Started: 06/11/2013
    Finished: 07/30/2013
    Source: NetGalley
    Reason: Civil War & Photography always gets my interest
    Format: ebook

    Publisher Synopsis

    The Civil War redefined America and forever changed American art. Its grim reality, captured through the new medium of photography, was laid bare. American artists could not approach the conflict with the conventions of European history painting, which glamorized the hero on the battlefield. Instead, many artists found ways to weave the war into works of art that considered the human narrative—the daily experiences of soldiers, slaves, and families left behind. Artists and writers wrestled with the ambiguity and anxiety of the Civil War and used landscape imagery to give voice to their misgivings as well as their hopes for themselves and the nation.

    This important book looks at the range of artwork created before, during, and following the war, in the years between 1852 and 1877. Author Eleanor Jones Harvey surveys paintings made by some of America’s finest artists, including Frederic Church, Sanford Gifford, Winslow Homer, and Eastman Johnson, and photographs taken by George Barnard, Alexander Gardner, and Timothy H. O’Sullivan.

    Harvey examines American landscape and genre painting and the new medium of photography to understand both how artists made sense of the war and how they portrayed what was a deeply painful, complex period in American history. Enriched by firsthand accounts of the war by soldiers, former slaves, abolitionists, and statesmen, Harvey’s research demonstrates how these artists used painting and photography to reshape American culture. Alongside the artworks, period voices (notably those of Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, and Walt Whitman) amplify the anxiety and dilemmas of wartime America.


    Author Info
    “In landscape paintings during the Civil War years, the skies and geography told a version of the story, bringing together literary metaphor and visual imagery to create a war-inflected layer of meaning. When we consider the literature, speeches, sermons, and letters that invoked stormy weather, volcanic eruptions, and celestial portents to understand the war and all its profound consequences, that imagery gains depth and the paintings’ meaning becomes clearer. Landscape painting thus became the emotional barometer of the mood of the nation.”—Eleanor Harvey


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