Nov 062013
 

The Civil War and American Art .
Eleanor Jones Harvey.

Former enslaved woman Harriet Jacobs (fig. 102) noted with disgust, “The secrets of slavery are concealed like those of the Inquisition. My master was, to my knowledge, the father of eleven slaves. But did the mothers dare tell who was the father of their children? Did other slaves dare allude to it, except in whispers among themselves? No indeed!” That a man could enslave his own children struck many as one of the gross moral failings of a slave society, and one which took place with far greater frequency than anyone was comfortable believing.

Page: 107

Owning slaves seems so anachronistic to us today. We cannot imagine it. How much more unthinkable is it that one would father children and see them as nothing more than chattel.

Book Posts

  • The Civil War and American Art – Eleanor Jones Harvey
  • Vocab: Insouciant – Try to use it nonchalantly
  • Vocab: elided – to leave out of consideration, to omit
  • Vocab: Stint – To Limit or Restrict
  • Enslaving Your Own Children


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    Jun 182013
     

    The Civil War and American Art .
    Eleanor Jones Harvey.

    Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau elided this concept with American transcendentalism, using their writings and lectures to advocate the spiritual values of experiencing nature firsthand.

    Page: 17

    Word: elide
    transitive verb
    Definition:
    1a : to suppress or alter (as a vowel or syllable) by elision
    1b : to strike out (as a written word)
    2a : to leave out of consideration : omit
    2b : curtail, abridge
    Pronunciation: \i-ˈlīd\
    Examples:
    – some unnecessary verbiage will need to be elided, but otherwise the article is publishable
    – the product presentation was not elided—it’s always only 15 minutes long
    Origin: Latin elidere to strike out, from e- + laedere to injure by striking
    First Known Use: 1796

    Not a common word yet I run into it again in another book later in the same month. I am taking it that it is definition 2a that is meant in this case, whereas it was meaning 1 that was emphasized in the prior quote.

    Guess this is a word that should not be elided from my vocabulary.

    Book Posts

  • The Civil War and American Art – Eleanor Jones Harvey
  • Vocab: Insouciant – Try to use it nonchalantly
  • Vocab: elided – to leave out of consideration, to omit
  • Vocab: Stint – To Limit or Restrict
  • Enslaving Your Own Children


  • My Social Media Links: Facebook; Google+; Twitter;
    Jun 142013
     

    The Civil War and American Art .
    Eleanor Jones Harvey.

    Twain earned the undying enmity of Confederate loyalists with his insouciant but accurate critique of the work…

    Page: 10

    Word: insouciant
    Definition: lighthearted unconcern : nonchalance
    Pronunciation: in-ˈsü-sē-ən(t)s, aⁿ-süs-ˈyäⁿs
    Example: wandered into the meeting with complete insouciance to the fact that she was late
    Origin: French, from in- + soucier to trouble, disturb, from Old French, from Latin sollicitare
    First Known Use: 1799
    I rarely get to use the word ‘nonchalance’ but if I ever do again, I have a new word to use instead.

    Book Posts

  • The Civil War and American Art – Eleanor Jones Harvey
  • Vocab: Insouciant – Try to use it nonchalantly
  • Vocab: elided – to leave out of consideration, to omit
  • Vocab: Stint – To Limit or Restrict
  • Enslaving Your Own Children


  • My Social Media Links: Facebook; Google+; Twitter;
    Jun 112013
     

    The Civil War and American Art .
    Eleanor Jones Harvey.
    The editors of each did not stint their opinions on the pages of their papers.
    –Page: 14

    stint

    verb (used without object)
     1. to be frugal; get along on a scanty allowance: Don’t stint on the food. They stinted for years in order to save money.
     2. Archaic. to cease action; desist.
    verb (used with object)
     3. to limit to a certain amount, number, share, or allowance, often unduly; set limits to; restrict.
     4. Archaic. to bring to an end; check.

    Didn’t really expect this book to be quite the source of new vocabulary words that it is. I guess I might say the author did not stint her use of obtuse vocabulary.

    Book Posts

  • The Civil War and American Art – Eleanor Jones Harvey
  • Vocab: Insouciant – Try to use it nonchalantly
  • Vocab: elided – to leave out of consideration, to omit
  • Vocab: Stint – To Limit or Restrict
  • Enslaving Your Own Children


  • Source: Dictionary.com
    My Social Media Links: Facebook; Google+; Twitter;
    Jun 112013
     

    The Civil War and American Art .
    Eleanor Jones Harvey.
    amazon.com
    LibraryThing
    GoodReads
    Google Books

    I requested this book as a review copy from NetGalley because of my fascination with the Civil War and my love for photography. I must admit I never considered how a painter might interpret current events in landscape paintings. Battle scenes, yes, but not in ‘regular’ landscapes. Looks to be quite interesting.

    Book Posts

  • The Civil War and American Art – Eleanor Jones Harvey
  • Vocab: Insouciant – Try to use it nonchalantly
  • Vocab: elided – to leave out of consideration, to omit
  • Vocab: Stint – To Limit or Restrict
  • Enslaving Your Own Children

  • Book Info

    The Civil War and American Art
    by Eleanor Jones Harvey
    Publisher: Yale University Press
    Published: 12/03/2012
    ISBN-10: 0300187335
    ISBN-13: 978-0300187335
    Started: 06/11/2013
    Finished: 07/30/2013
    Source: NetGalley
    Reason: Civil War & Photography always gets my interest
    Format: ebook

    Publisher Synopsis

    The Civil War redefined America and forever changed American art. Its grim reality, captured through the new medium of photography, was laid bare. American artists could not approach the conflict with the conventions of European history painting, which glamorized the hero on the battlefield. Instead, many artists found ways to weave the war into works of art that considered the human narrative—the daily experiences of soldiers, slaves, and families left behind. Artists and writers wrestled with the ambiguity and anxiety of the Civil War and used landscape imagery to give voice to their misgivings as well as their hopes for themselves and the nation.

    This important book looks at the range of artwork created before, during, and following the war, in the years between 1852 and 1877. Author Eleanor Jones Harvey surveys paintings made by some of America’s finest artists, including Frederic Church, Sanford Gifford, Winslow Homer, and Eastman Johnson, and photographs taken by George Barnard, Alexander Gardner, and Timothy H. O’Sullivan.

    Harvey examines American landscape and genre painting and the new medium of photography to understand both how artists made sense of the war and how they portrayed what was a deeply painful, complex period in American history. Enriched by firsthand accounts of the war by soldiers, former slaves, abolitionists, and statesmen, Harvey’s research demonstrates how these artists used painting and photography to reshape American culture. Alongside the artworks, period voices (notably those of Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, and Walt Whitman) amplify the anxiety and dilemmas of wartime America.


    Author Info
    “In landscape paintings during the Civil War years, the skies and geography told a version of the story, bringing together literary metaphor and visual imagery to create a war-inflected layer of meaning. When we consider the literature, speeches, sermons, and letters that invoked stormy weather, volcanic eruptions, and celestial portents to understand the war and all its profound consequences, that imagery gains depth and the paintings’ meaning becomes clearer. Landscape painting thus became the emotional barometer of the mood of the nation.”—Eleanor Harvey


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