Jul 032013
 

Foodist.
Darya Pino Rose.

When I was growing up, my mom always told me that I needed to eat everything I was served, because children in other countries were starving. Of course, she never bothered to explain why our family’s gluttony made everything okay in the rest of the world.

Page: 204

In my youth I had wished my mom would send my vegetables to the starving children, but never considered her remarks as justifying ‘gluttony’ but what else can you call the amount of food we as Americans consume.


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Jun 162013
 

Foodist.
Darya Pino Rose.

Here is a more colorful version of the SummerTomato graphic “How to Find Real Food at the Supermarket” found on page 114 of the ebook. It is amazing how little ‘real’ food is to be found at the grocery store.

Some of my favorites:
“Does it make a health claim” – Like “Gluten Free” or “Low Fat”
“Might contain Bacon anyway”

Which is your favorite ‘yes/no’ question?

How to Find Real Food at the Supermarket

How to Find Real Food at the Supermarket


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Jun 132013
 

Foodist.
Darya Pino Rose.

To become a foodist, you need to get out of the dieter’s habit of scheduling good behavior for when it’s more convenient.

Page: 90

It is so easy to ‘start tomorrow’ on something that should and could so easily be done today. This includes getting started on eating right.

Why not quit buying the junk food that so easily entices and maybe even clear out the bags and boxes of fake food in your cupboards and begin right now on a journey towards eating better? What are you afraid of?


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Jun 112013
 

Foodist.
Darya Pino Rose.

One thing I’ve discovered since switching to unprocessed, real food is that most of the things I considered decadent treats in the past really aren’t as good as I thought they were. When you start to appreciate that even vegetables can taste amazing, your standards for what is worth eating drastically rise. Also, your palate acclimates to real flavors, and it becomes easy to recognize the overly sweet, salty, and creamy (i.e., fatty) concoctions that pass for indulgence in the industrial food chain. Your mouth starts perceiving these imitations for what they really are: bad for you, without any real taste.

Page: 79

Many of the desserts on our recent cruise seemed bland. Makes me wonder if they were any different than past desserts or if, having cut out added sugar in my daily eating, I no longer have cravings for things sweet.


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Jun 092013
 

Foodist.
Darya Pino Rose.

One of the biggest problems of modern society is the obscenely common use of sugar in nondessert foods. Although it’s fairly obvious to most people that a glazed doughnut isn’t the healthiest choice (10 grams of sugar), a Thai chicken salad from California Pizza Kitchen contains over four times as much sugar (45 grams). Sure, there are additional benefits from eating salad vegetables, but would you have guessed you were eating the equivalent of four doughnuts worth of sweetness by ordering a salad?

Page: 66

Ever since the ‘low-fat’ craze has taken hold, food manufacturers (there is something wrong with that combination of words) have replaced the healthy, satiating fat that would come naturally in foods with sugar and other sweetners to make their creations palatable. Where I see this most often is in yogurt, labeled “low-fat” but with enough sugar (aka fruit) added that any health claims are moot.


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