Jan 142013
 

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.
Page: 57

Imagine a pile of sugar on your plate the size of a baked potato or a serving of rice. The effect on your blood insulin levels is the same. If you want to eliminate glucose shocks, you have to reduce your consumption of potatoes and rice.

….

The trick to reducing your potato and rice consumption is to have a few bites if you must, ut don’t use them to satisfy your appetite. Wait until you finish eating the other food on your plate, then go ahead and take a few bites. You will find you need only a little–probably less than a fourth of a typical serving. Keep in mind as you eat these starches that even though they’re largely tasteless, you might as well be eating sugar.

We would never consider eating a pile of plain sugar on our plate yet we don’t blink an eye when filling ourselves with rice or potato in its many forms. About the only time I have rice or potato on my plate is when we eat out. I have found it no problem to either skip them all together if I am already full after eating the rest of the meal or having just a bite or two if they look especially appetizing. This is so much different than my prior diet where I felt a compunction to treat the rice or potato as part of the main dish which I would never consider not finishing.

Jan 112013
 

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.
Page: 44-47
Nutritionists now rate foods according to their glycemic indexes, the amount a food raises blood glucose compared with a benchmark–usually white bread. An apple, for example, has a glycemic index of 52, which means that 50 grams of carbohydrate in an apple raises blood glucose levels 52 percent as much as 50 grams of carbohydrate in white bread.

Sounds quite scientific and easy to use except for one important fact. The index is “per 50 grams of carbohydrate” not 50 grams of the food or the “per serving” we are used to seeing as the standard on most nutrition labels. Researchers were not measuring the quantity of carbohydrate in a food but the impact of that food’s type of carbohydrate on blood glucose.

However, the amount of available carbohydrate in various plant-based foods varies tremendously. For example, because carrots contain so much water and unavailable carbohydrate in the form of indigestible fiber, to provide 50 grams of available carbohydrate, reserchers had to feed each subject seven full-size carrots. In contrast, to provide 50 grams of available carbohydrate in spaghetti, they had to feed subjects only a cupful.

Now, when you open the fridge do you grab 7 full size carrots? 7 carrots eaten together have a glycemic index of 68. A cup of spaghetti has an index of 64. So, even though almost equal in terms of glycemic index, a cup of spaghetti has 7 times the impact of a carrot on your blood sugar.

Correcting glycemic indexes for serving size exposes refined carbs as the culprits they really are. Bagels, for example, aren’t just a little worse than carrots, they’re terrible! You would have to eat 30 raw carrots to get the glucose shock you get from one bagel.

Adjusting a food’s glycemic index based on serving size is called a food’s glycemic load. Glycemic load, then, is a measure of the effect on blood sugar of a normal serving size of food. So, if we want to control blood sugar spikes and the body’s insulin response, the glycemic load and not glycemic index of a food is what we need to be concerned with.

Jan 102013
 

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.
Page: 43
The reason most diets fail is simply that people can’t stick with them. People crave the richness of fat and quickly either fall of the wagon or try to satisfy their hunger by eating too much starch and sugar. That’s why low-fat diets require you to count calories–essentially to go hungry. Low-carb diets are easier to follow because you can eat satisfying amounts of food. However, they often make the mistake of restricting too many foods. Currently popular low-carb diets limit fruits, vegetables, dairy products, and sweets and usually can’t resist throwing in some low-cholesterol advice. All these restrictions inevitably lead to food cravings and diet failure. However, most important, they divert attention from the real culprits: foods that raise your body’s demands for insulin.

I have been amazed how my appetite has dwindled. I no longer have an urge for a snack 2 hours after breakfast, lunch, or dinner. It used to be that just the sight of some confection would cause my mouth to water and my fingers to reach out. Now, I can just say they look nice but have no compunction to put them in my mouth.


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Jan 082013
 

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.

The bottom line is that refined carbohydrades are unnatural foods that behave unnaturally in our bodies. It's not surprising that the more of these "bad carbs" wwe eat, the fatter and more diabetic we get.

The reason low-carb diets cause weight loss is not that they restrict carbohydrates in general. In fact, the more fruits and vegetables people consume, the less likely they are to be overweight. Low-carb diets work because they eliminate refined carbohydrates--flour products, potatoes, rice, and sugar.

Page: 39

I joke that I am more vegetarian than some vegetarians I know. Having removed meat from their diet, they now eat more carbs. Instead of being vegetarians, maybe they are carbotarians! On the other hand, rather than increasing the amount of protein that I eat, I have tried to replaced the refined carbs in my diet with more vegies.

Once I get down to my ‘goal weight,’ I don’t plan on reintroducing the ‘bad carbs’ into my diet. This is not a short-term weight-loss diet but a lifesyle diet. I now know that I am insulin resistant, that my body is allergic to refined carbs, and that to reintroduce them would mean that I would put back on every pound I have been able to shed.


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Jun 162012
 

Dr. Peter Attia’s blog, The War on Insulin and the Defense of Fat, overflows with information. The doctor shares not just well written posts but he interacts with almost every reader’s comments so that the comments provide just as much info as the original post. Not something you run into very often.

His response here about why we get fat is very well put.

“The current or conventional wisdom says we get fat because we eat too much or move too little. I believe that that’s actually got the cause and effect backwards. I’m obviously not alone in thinking this, but I believe that it’s the opposite. I believe that we eat too much and/or move too little because we are getting fat.”