Feb 062013

Shooting Blanks.
Alan Gottlieb and Dave Workman.
Google Books

The authors answer the many arguments usually posed against the individual ownership of firearms, concealed carry, and the individual rights protected by the second amendment. They seem to deal factually with the issues but this may just be how it appears to me since I agree with their positions.

The book is an easy read, almost like a FAQ for the 2nd Amendment, giving a common question that people have about guns, gun ownership, and gun usage then providing a thorough answer incorporating relevant facts and statistics. This is a book that every gun owner should read as well as those who don’t like guns so they can refute the authors’ arguments.

I would like to read a book taking the pro gun-control side, If you know of one that is not just a screed against guns and gun owners, let me know (especially if you can loan it to me).

Book Info

Shooting Blanks: Facts Don't Matter to the Gun Ban Crowd
by Alan Gottlieb and Dave Workman
Publisher: Merril Press
ISBN-10: 093678363X
ISBN-13: 978-0936783635
Started: 01/01/2013
Finished: 01/12/2013
Source: Mid-Columbia Library
Reason: I was looking for some books on gun control from the library. I decided to read this one first because it is the most recent book they have and from the table of contents it appears to answer many of the questions I hear people asking.
Format: Paperback

Publisher Synopsis

Another timely expose by Alan Gottlieb and Dave Workman. They debunk the so-called facts that the gun ban crowd uses to try to push through more regulations and more laws and file more law suits to take away the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms.

Author Info

Alan Gottlieb is recognized as a member of the working press, maintaining active membership in the Outdoor Writers Association of America. He is listed in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in the World and Who's Who in American Politics.Alan has appeared on over 3,000 TV and radio talk shows, including the Lehrer News Hour, ABC's 20/20, CNN Crossfire, Fox TV, NBC Today Show, Larry King Live and Good Morning America.Alan is also President of KBNP in Portland, KITZ in Seattle and KSBN in Spokane and Chairman of the Board of Talk America Radio Network with more than 700 affiliates coast-to-coast.Dave Workman is a career journalist, freelance writer and author. Now senior editor for the Second Amendment Foundation, he spent 21 years as a senior editor and writer at Outdoor Empire Publishing. Workman began his career running a small-town newspaper and "stringing" for the Associated Press. Over the years, his byline has appeared in several newspapers and publications.

Dave Workman is an award winning outdoor writer who has authored numerous books. His articles appear in several outdoor publications that include Fishing & Hunting News, Gun Week, Gun World as well as newspapers coast-to-coast such as the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

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Jan 292013

conceal carry Where can you legally carry a pistol/handgun, loaded or unloaded, concealed or not while in Washington State? Even though the title of the following RCW (Revised Code of Washington) is “Carrying Firearms”, it only deals with handguns not all firearms and primarily with respect to conceal carry on the person and handguns in vehicles.

RCW 9.41.050 – Carrying firearms

(1)(a) Except in the person’s place of abode or fixed place of business, a person shall not carry a pistol concealed on his or her person without a license to carry a concealed pistol (CPL).

Of the 3 rules in this section this one probably needs no explanation. Stated simply, you cannot conceal a weapon on your person unless you have a conceal carry license or you are at your ‘abode or fixed place of business.’ Only thing I have not seen spelled out is if a motorhome or camping trailer would be considered an ‘abode’ either while parked or moving but since I have my conceal pistol license, I don’t have to worry about that question.

The other thing of note is that it does not specify that it is dealing with the concealment of loaded pistols and therefore having an unloaded pistol concealed on your person would be just as illegal. The exception to this is noted below, without a license you can ‘conceal’ a handgun in an ‘opaque container’ or ‘secure wrapper’.

(2)(a) A person shall not carry or place a loaded pistol in any vehicle unless the person has a license to carry a concealed pistol and:
   (i) The pistol is on the licensee’s person,
   (ii) the licensee is within the vehicle at all times that the pistol is there, or
   (iii) the licensee is away from the vehicle and the pistol is locked within the vehicle and concealed from view from outside the vehicle.

I have seen quite a bit of discussion on this rule. Most of the confusion is because people don’t read it correctly, thinking there is an ‘and’ between (i) and (ii) instead of the implied ‘or’. First off, the only hassle-free way you may possess a loaded firearm in a vehicle is if you have a concealed pistol license. An exception to this, noted below, is if you are engaging in or on your way to an ‘outdoor activity’. Rule 3 below will deal with persons without a conceal carry permit. So, with a conceal permit, part (i) says that if the loaded handgun is on your person then you are fine. Part (ii) says the loaded handgun can be anywhere in the car as long as the licensee is also be in the car. This means the pistol does not have to be out of sight or concealed. It can be on the seat, in the glove box, or anywhere you choose to place it as long as you are in the vehicle. Part (iii) is the only other possible situation, if the licensee leaves the vehicle, the loaded pistol can be left in the vehicle as long as the vehicle is locked and the pistol is not visible from outside the vehicle.

(3)(a) A person at least eighteen years of age who is in possession of an unloaded pistol shall not leave the unloaded pistol in a vehicle unless the unloaded pistol is locked within the vehicle and concealed from view from outside the vehicle.

Finally, if you don’t have a concealed pistol license, then to have a handgun in the vehicle it must be unloaded and you must be at least 18 years old. If you are going to leave the handgun in an unattended vehicle, the vehicle must be locked and the unloaded handgun must be concealed from view.

So, Washington may be an ‘open carry’ state, but when you get in your car, the handgun can no longer be loaded if you do not have a concealed pistol license. I find it interesting that the definition of ‘loaded’ (RCW 9.41.010 does not specify any significant physical separation of the ammo from the handgun. If the magazine has been removed and the handgun does not have a round in the chamber the handgun is considered unloaded even if both the handgun and the ammo are in the same carrying case or glove box.

The next RCW lists exceptions to the above laws, two of which apply to us regular citizens.

RCW 9.41.060 – Exceptions to restrictions on carrying firearms.

The provisions of RCW 9.41.050 shall not apply to:

(8) Any person engaging in a lawful outdoor recreational activity such as hunting, fishing, camping, hiking, or horseback riding, only if, considering all of the attendant circumstances, including but not limited to whether the person has a valid hunting or fishing license, it is reasonable to conclude that the person is participating in lawful outdoor activities or is traveling to or from a legitimate outdoor recreation area;

This odd exception seems to be saying that a loaded pistol may be carried on the person or in the vehicle by anyone either engaging in any outdoor activity or on their way to or from such activity. In all the reading I have done I have not figured out how such a broad exception got written into the law.

(9) Any person while carrying a pistol unloaded and in a closed opaque case or secure wrapper;

It must be remembered that this is an exception and not a ‘rule’. A pistol is not considered ‘concealed’ if it is in an opaque case such as a plastic box like you get when you buy your gun or in a secure wrapper which I have seen described as a backpack. In other words, you are allowed to carry a ‘concealed’ unloaded pistol using either of these two methods, since without this rule you could not carry a pistol out of a store without breaking law unless you carried it in plain sight. This rule has nothing to do with how the handgun must be stored in the car, otherwise it would have been put it RCW 9.41.050 and not here in the exceptions to that section.

In a future post we will look at specific places that you can and cannot carry a handgun in Washington State.

Legal Disclaimer: We make every effort to provide correct information on this site. However, the legal landscape surrounding gun laws is fluid and subject to a myriad of political and legal opinions. Therefore, any and all information you glean from this site should be treated as just my opinion and not relied upon unless independently verified!

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Jan 062013

States that honor an Oregon Conceal Carry License

States that honor an Oregon Conceal Carry License

I have had my Washington Concealed Pistol License (CPL) for over 10 years and decided it was time to get a conceal carry license for Oregon as well. According to USACarry.com, my Washington CPL is currently recognized by 25 other states but our neighbor to the south, Oregon, is not one of them. Oregon, unlike almost ever other state, does not recognize concealed weapons permits from any other state. So, to carry a pistol either in the car or on your person, you must have a conceal carry license from Oregon.

We travel extensively through Oregon both on our way from eastern Washington to the Oregon and Washington coast and to visit family down in Boise, Idaho. We also enjoy camping and hiking in many Oregon State Parks as well as the numerous scenic areas in northeastern Oregon. Without an Oregon conceal carry license, before crossing the state line I must make sure to store my pistol in the trunk so as not to get in trouble if I happen to get pulled over for a faulty tail light or whatnot.

Oregon is a ‘shall issue’ state for Oregon residents only. ‘Shall Issue’ means that the local sheriff will (must) issue a conceal carry license to those who meet the Oregon conceal carry licensing requirements. To receive a non-resident license, applicants must either 1) own or lease property in Oregon or 2) be a resident of one of the four states contiguous to Oregon; California, Nevada, Idaho, and Washington. Non-resident applicants must meet the same requirements as Oregon residents plus submit a letter addressed to the sheriff explaining why they ‘need’ to carry concealed in the sheriff’s county. Oregon law says the sheriff ‘may issue’ conceal carry licenses to qualified non-residents at his discretion. If the sheriff is a proponent of the Second Amendment then you have a good chance of having your license approved, if the sheriff does not believe in the right for citizens to keep and bear arms, then you had better apply in a different county.

The sheriff offices do not allow you to submit an conceal carry application by mail and most require non-residents to set an appointment to bring in the application. When calling my nearby sheriff’s office, I was only able to leave a voice mail and did not get a call back that day. I ended up sending an email and was pleasantly surprised to get a response within the hour with a date and time, even though it was 6 weeks in the future. If you plan on getting an Oregon conceal carry license, don’t wait till you have taken the class to set your appointment.

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Dec 282012

hoodie conceal carry After having a concealed pistol license in Washington for 10 years, I finally decided that I should put it to use and buy a gun that I can actually carry. Washington state law requires you have a concealed pistol license (CPL) when you:

  • Carry a pistol concealed on your person.
  • Carry or place a loaded pistol in a vehicle.
But what are my reasons for why I would want to carry a pistol with me?
  • First, in the course of my business I regularly carry fairly large sums of cash and fear someone deciding that I am expendable in their effort to rob me.
  • Second, our office was burgled the other night. While waiting for the restoration company to arrive at 2am in the morning, I realized how vulnerable I was. Rather than wait inside the office which was missing a plate glass window in the wee hours of the morning, I decided to wait out in my car (and didn’t feel much safer).
  • Finally, I like going out on hikes to either explore or to photograph and am always leery of the characters I might run in to. So far I have ‘met’ some interesting characters but who’s to say the next one won’t be unstable.

Having decided I want a pistol I can carry concealed on my person, I now have to choose which gun I want. In researching the various guns I know I want to have at least a .380 and no more than a .45 though the 9mm seems to have the most going for it. It is large enough to be effective for self defense yet not so large as to make the gun difficult to shoot. Another positive is that 9mm ammunition is usually the least expensive large caliber ammo available.

I checked out some of the ‘single stack’ guns like the Diamondback DB9 and Ruger LC9. The advantage of single stack ammunition magazine is that it allows the gun grip to be narrower but this ‘feature’ limits the number of bullets to usually 6 rounds per magazine. A double stack magazine, like the Glocks will allow 10+ shells per magazine though this makes the grip wider and thus more difficult to conceal. Personally I like the feel of the double stack grip in my hand. I also read a number of accounts of these small single stack guns being uncomfortable to shoot. This is usually justified by saying they are designed for personal defense, not target practice. The problem is that you need to be comfortable shooting any gun you plan to use for personal defense. The only way to do that is through lots of practice at the target range.

Next, deciding which gun to buy.

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