Jan 172013

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.
Page: 58
One of the reasons low-carb diets are more effective than low-fat diets is that the culprits are so obvious. It’s much simpler to avoid starch than fat.

I think this has been what has made going low-carb so easy. It is so black and white that I am not having to make judgement calls. I either can eat it or ignore it, no maybe.

Jan 142013

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.
Page: 57

Imagine a pile of sugar on your plate the size of a baked potato or a serving of rice. The effect on your blood insulin levels is the same. If you want to eliminate glucose shocks, you have to reduce your consumption of potatoes and rice.


The trick to reducing your potato and rice consumption is to have a few bites if you must, ut don’t use them to satisfy your appetite. Wait until you finish eating the other food on your plate, then go ahead and take a few bites. You will find you need only a little–probably less than a fourth of a typical serving. Keep in mind as you eat these starches that even though they’re largely tasteless, you might as well be eating sugar.

We would never consider eating a pile of plain sugar on our plate yet we don’t blink an eye when filling ourselves with rice or potato in its many forms. About the only time I have rice or potato on my plate is when we eat out. I have found it no problem to either skip them all together if I am already full after eating the rest of the meal or having just a bite or two if they look especially appetizing. This is so much different than my prior diet where I felt a compunction to treat the rice or potato as part of the main dish which I would never consider not finishing.

Jan 132013

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.
Page: 56
Indeed, whole grain bread breaks down to glucose slower than white bread does, so its glycemic index (not load) is a little lower. However, those tiny kernels are packed with starch. Slice for slice, whole grain bread contains up to twice as much starch as white bread. You simply get more food in a slice of whole grain bread. The glycemic load of whole grain bread–which takes into account the amount of carbohydrate in a typical serving–is actually higher than that of white bread.

We have been told that whole grains are better for us. Even thought a slice of whole grain bread might be more nutritious, it also impacts blood glucose more than plain white bread. If you are insulin resistant, in other words, starch is the culprit that is making you fat, then a slight bump in nutrition does not outweigh the glucose shock to your health.

Jan 122013

The Glycemic Load Diet.
Rob Thompson MD.
Page: 50

How easy is it to lower the glycemic load of your everyday diet?

If you get rid of just four foods–flour products, potatoes, rice, and soft drinks–the glycemic load of your diet will be a fraction of what it was. You don’t even need a list of glycemic loads to tell you what to eat. Starch is never hidden or blended into other foods. You can see it from across the room. The culprits are even color-coded for you: They are usually white. The only other foods with glycemic loads as high as the starchy stuff are juices and soft drinks. So, if you cut out the starch and the sugar-containing beverages, you eliminate nearly all of the glucose shocks in your diet.

The glycemic load diet is much more lenient than the low-carb/high-fat diet I have been on but it probably more closely resembles the diet I will continue with for the foreseeable future. Once I am down to my goal weight, about another 10 pounds, the only thing I really plan on changing is that I might have some rice or potato with my meal but in much smaller quantities than in the past.

Here’s my advice: Forget about lists. Just don’t eat more than a third of a serving of flour products, potatoes, or rice at any meal, and abstain from sugar-containing soft drinks and fruit juices. Otherwise, eat anything you want. There’s probably not enough starch or sugar in the rest of your food to cause you trouble. A weight-loss program can’t get any simpler than that, which is why this will finally be the weight loss program that works for you.

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Oct 092012

Wheat Belly.
William Davis.
Google Books

On August 12th, 2012, nearly a year after being published and having popped on to the top-ten list 16 times, Wheat Belly by Dr. William Davis finally made it to the #1 spot on the New York Times Bestseller list under the Hard Cover Advice & Miscellaneous category. Except for one week as #2 it has remained at the top spot for the last 3 months. The contrarian Wheat Belly message, that eating “healthy whole grains” is ineffective, fattening, and downright destructive, appears to be growing.

Book Info

Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health
by William Davis
Publisher: Rodale
Published: 08/30/2011
ISBN-10: 1609611543
ISBN-13: 978-1609611545
Started: 10/07/2012
Finished: 10/31/2012
Source: Amazon
Reason: I decided to read this book because it was mentioned frequently on the numerous Low-Carb websites and podcasts.
Format: Hardback

Publisher Synopsis

A provocative look at how eliminating wheat from our diets can help us lose weight, shrink unsightly bulges, and reverse a broad spectrum of health problems–from acne to diabetes and serious digestive disorders.

Since the introduction of dietary guidelines calling for reduced fat intake in the 1970s, a strange phenomenon has occurred: Americans have steadily, inexorably become heavier, less healthy, and more prone to diabetes than ever before. After putting more than two thousand of his at-risk patients on a wheat-free regimen and seeing extraordinary results, cardiologist William Davis has come to the disturbing conclusion that it is not fat, not sugar, not our sedentary lifestyle that is causing America’s obesity epidemic–it is wheat. How this once-benign grain–now genetically modified almost beyond recognition and found in virtually every course of every meal–has come to have such a profound and deleterious effect on our collective well-being is one of the great untold health stories of our generation.

In Wheat Belly, Dr. Davis exposes the truth about modern-day wheat, deconstructing its historical role in the human diet and the agricultural evolutions that have created a hybrid grain that has a greater impact on blood sugar levels than pure cane sugar and many of the addictive characteristics of a narcotic. He sheds light on wheat’s connection to weight gain as well as to a host of other adverse effects from diabetes to heart disease to immunologic and neurologic disorders like celiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and dementia.

Finally, to help listeners dependent on wheat products make the move to a wheat-free diet, he presents a clear-cut action plan packed with food and lifestyle tips, meal plans, and recipes.

Informed by decades of clinical research and backed by case studies of men and women who have experienced life-changing transformations in their health after waving good-bye to wheat, Wheat Belly is an illuminating look at a familiar food as well as an affirmative life plan for regaining health and losing unwanted pounds.

Author Info
William Davis, MD, is a preventive cardiologist whose unique approach to diet allows him to advocate reversal, not just prevention, of heart disease. He is the founder of the TrackYourPlaque.com program. He lives in Wisconsin.